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« Part III: Madness Of The Builders | Main | In The South And West, People Build With No Regard For Reality »

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blues

Paris is such a small town. Only Rome was like New York. They had unimaginable diversity. But diversity is so strangely opposed to cosmopolitanism. The world is full of fools living on faults. Most are filled with the false faith that is worse than no faith whatsoever. A million slimy things fell asleep, but I ranted on.

Elaine Meinel Supkis

That's ok.


I really should do more humor here. For some reason, much of my writing of late is rather dark but then, this is appropriate for these times, I'm afraid.

I really got sick to my stomach when the Baker commission leaked their report. It showed how totally insane we really are. All the news since is even more insane.


It really is bothersome. Why can't people see things that are so painfully obvious? I was against executing Saddam, I knew he would go out in full glory as a martyr and sure enough, he did exactly that!

And on it goes....

mark abbott

I want a round of whatever blues is having.

Wow, Elaine ... so you knew some of the first men infected by Patient Zero, Gaetan Dugas, the flight attendant from Quebec. Randy Shilts sure seemed to nail that story down solid.

blues

"I just uttered: 'they don't call me blues for nothing' somewhere around here." — From a recent rant.

I recently entered that line on another blog. You know, people have accused me of calling myself 'blues' to cloak my 'real' identity as a troll! I always would show an ancient link in early 2004, where I just plucked that nom de blog out of the blue sky for the now-gone repentantnadervoter.org forum. That was before the advent of the blue-state/red-state paradigm. And I'm not black; and I don't play no musical instruments (I do fix amps...).

blues

It really means sweetening your sorrows into music. I have a very convoluted relationship with these words, you see. Sometimes I can even hear them.

blues

Let this be The Page Of Doom.

------------------------------

http://www.exitmundi.nl/exitmundi.htm

http://www.rotten.com/library/

http://www.subgenius.com/id4/id4.html

http://www.greatdreams.com/2012.htm

------------------------------

I love the smell of apocalypse in the mourning.

JSmith

"Just like AIDS probably started in Africa, it traveled to Haiti and then literally flew into New York City and when the carrier had sex with just two ballet dancers, it spread like wildfire soon after that..."

There's certainly something to be said for not hopping into the sack with just anyone. I engaged in some risky behavior in the 70s (didn't we all?) but I was lucky - I never caught anything worse than a cold. And I'd settled down by the time AIDS showed up.

"First off: Target 11? Whenever I see magic numbers attached to things like this (New World Order-type stuff) my alarm bells ring."

Good God. What if it had been Target 17? But I suppose that's a "magic number" too (aren't they all?) Which raises a good question - are there any non-magical numbers?

From an environmental standpoint, you want most of the human population clustered into cities. Waste disposal, etc., is more efficient that way, and large segments of the countryside are not subjected to as many human depradations. The US Great Plains are gradually clearing as younger people quit the tiny towns in the middle of nowhere for more interesting places (and who can blame 'em?)

"I was against executing Saddam..."

Poor Saddam.


blues

I don't want to start a FLAME WAR or anything like that (God forbid!). But I think I basically disagree with most everything JSmith just asserted. In any warped space, the shortest distance between two points is never a straight line. Then, do you think you might happen to reside in an unwarped space?

I should emphasize that I was appalled at the stupidity of lynching Saddam Hussein. After all, he was the only elected President of Iraq. And I don't even think Diebold had a hand in that. Besides, it comes with a 100% guarantee of severely ratcheting up the violence there. If you, JSmith, have any children serving there, the logic of that alone should persuade you.

JSmith

"I think I basically disagree with most everything JSmith just asserted."

No reason for a flame war... I'm used to being disagreed-with (just ask Elaine!) But some reasons why you disagree wold be nice.

First... Why is hopping into bed with just anyone a good idea, once you're over 25? And now... a thorough background check for your prospective partners isn't a bad idea.

You think six billion humans spread out all over the landscape would be a good idea? That would put a rapid end to any natural spaces we've thus far been able to preserve.

"I should emphasize that I was appalled at the stupidity of lynching Saddam Hussein. "

I was appalled at the stupidity of getting it over with so quickly. They could have at least hauled him up four inches off the floor and let him dangle for a while.

"If you, JSmith, have any children..."

I, JSmith, have no children.

blues

Just cramming people into mega-cities is going to be MUCH more unhealthy than all but the most profligate libidinal wantonness. It cannot go on being six billion forever. But that is no excuse for some tin-badge fuhrer to go lighting up ovens.

The magic numbers thing is for insiders. If you don't get it, you probably aren't supposed to get it.

Also, it has been said "Thou shalt not kill."

Elaine Meinel Supkis

It was worse than a crime to hang Saddam it was a mistake (paraphrasing the old chestnut which remains true today!).


Mega-cities with mega-slums=tremendous violence capped by sweeping plagues. The health of Europeans improved tremendously after the Black Plague swept through, for example. The skeletons of the surviving populations were bigger and had fewer rickets, etc.

DaliWood

The psychological and social ramifications of urban dwelling are, I think, extremely important. Children raised in cities--even vibrant, wealthy cities--can develop a sad disconnect from the natural world. They do not understand natural processes and events. They find comfort in concrete, not nature. Point to a tree in Central Park and ask New York kids, "What kind of tree is that?" They most likely won't know or care.

City dwelling isn't inherently damaging psychologically, and I'm sure there are kids in New York who can identify more trees than I can. Nevertheless, American cities typically cram people together and then foolishly cultivate all kinds of ways to make the population anti-social and resentful (e.g., brutal police forces). Cities become pressure cookers, not communes.

There may also be political dangers for the ruling elites. If mega-cities develop a sense of self, an identity as a community, then we could see the return of bickering "city-states." A number of cities already hate each other over things as trivial as sports teams. Give them an equally unifying but more important point of focus and they might just start thinking of themselves as independent from the surrounding country.

Elaine Meinel Supkis

First thing I did in NYC was join and form a group to plant trees which we got from various organizations which wanted to extend trees in cities.

I'm really good at blasting away at sidewalks, breaking up cement slabs or prying up slate. Protecting the trees was hard work. People carved them up, ran them over, yanked off branches and vandalized them a lot.

JSmith

"Just cramming people into mega-cities is going to be MUCH more unhealthy than all but the most profligate libidinal wantonness. It cannot go on being six billion forever. But that is no excuse for some tin-badge fuhrer to go lighting up ovens."

How you get from mega-cities to ovens is... not readily apparent.

I grew up (childhood to highschool) in the country; our nearest neighbors were a mile down the road. The last thing I want is greater population density in the countryside. Then it's not countryside any more.

DeVaul

The problem, Smith, is that the larger the city, the greater its needs -- as in food, trees, animals, stone, minerals, coal, oil, medicinal plants, and even recreational areas for city people who "want to get away from it all".

That means your countyside will be appropriated for the use of city people, and you cannot stop them because they outnumber you and pass laws that allow them to plunder your land even while you sit on it.

Many people in Eastern Kentucky lost their homes, farms, and everything else because New Yorkers owned the mineral rights under their land. The coal was shipped to New York and other major cities. Eastern Kentucky was left as a honeycombed wasteland. I have seen it with my own eyes.

Only after war broke out did the bankers back off. The loss of equipment due to sabatage became too expensive. People were allowed to keep their homes and the mining companies had to dig under them or go away.

These protections came about because there were enough people living in the countryside in extended family groups to form a resistance to the city slickers. Otherwise, Eastern Kentucky would look like Haiti by now.

JSmith

"That means your countyside will be appropriated for the use of city people, and you cannot stop them because they outnumber you and pass laws that allow them to plunder your land even while you sit on it."

Eastern KY got messed up decades ago. Best account of the subject I know of is Caudill's _Night Comes to the Cumberlands_.

Now... The exact opposite is occurring in places like Seattle: the greeners that live there are passing environmentally-friendly and quite restrictive laws that prevent those who live in the countryside from lumbering, selling their property to developers, etc.

DeVaul

"[no]...lumbering"

What do you mean by this? No clearcutting? That's a good law. Cannot cut down a single tree anywhere? That's a bad law.

I am not against people cutting down a tree on their property to make some furniture or build a home for themselves, but clearcutting forests to pay off junk bonds or make a quick profit is something I am totally against.

Trees are too valuable to be wasted on chipboard and crap like that.

And yes, I know Eastern Kentucky was clearcut back at the turn of the century. I saw all the young trees as I moved through the new forest that grew up after the disaster. I also prevented my fellow surveyors from chopping down ancient trees just to get a "clearer line of sight".

It also prevented mountain men from gliding up the hills with a hounddog and a doublebarrelled shotgun wanting to know what the hell we were doing to their trees. They had long memories.

metal buildings

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metal buildings

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